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Posted by David Bator – TemboStatus October 6, 2015

There’s a lot of talk about engagement surveys and many organizations do them, but you may be asking yourself: “Why should I do a survey?”

While it is true that a well-executed survey does take some planning and action to be successful, the benefits are numerous.

Here are a few:

1.The results provide an unfiltered perspective of how things are going in the organization.

– results reflect the actual employee experience rather than the company line.

– provides a bottom-up view that is less filtered than other information channels – likely to be more candid and from a different perspective.

– allows you to identify pockets of the organization that are doing better or worse – can identify areas that can be role models to learn from and areas where more efforts need to be made.

 

2. The results provide data to support new initiatives

– results can provide an impetus for change and provide the leverage needed to make changes in the organization.

– results provide a metric to evaluate change efforts- can be used to see if change efforts are having an impact.

 

3. Surveys are a communication tool

– the content of the survey tells your employees that they are valued and their input is important

– the content can be focused on the issues that are most important to the organization – this shows employees what is valued

 

HOWEVER –If you are just curious but have no intention on taking action – DON’T DO IT. This would be like saying hello to somebody and then just walking away. Your employee engagement survey is the first chapter in what MUST BECOME an ongoing conversation with your employees.

 

October 12, 2015

3 Reasons to do an Employee Engagement Survey

There’s a lot of talk about engagement surveys and many organizations do them, but you may be asking yourself: “Why should I do a survey?” While it is true that a well-executed survey does take some planning and action to be successful, the benefits are numerous.
October 12, 2015

Both The Past AND Future Expectations Can Dramatically Impact Engagement Levels

Employee engagement continues to drive very positive business outcomes and is a vital concern for leaders around the world, but efforts to improve engagement frequently under perform. Research from the Corporate Executive Board (CEB), titled Capitalizing on Engagement, indicates the lack of consistent results may be the product of not knowing which solutions best sustain engagement over time, and acknowledges employees’ present experiences don’t provide an accurate assessment. Most organizations measure engagement by employees’ present perceptions and develop action plans focused on that narrow set of issues, but CEB measured employee perceptions across multiple time horizons to better link engagement action plans to underlying root causes of disengagement.
October 1, 2015

The Key To Engaged Employees? It’s Mainly About Better Communication

Harvard Business Review recently sponsored an Interact/Harris Poll of around 1,000 U.S. employees that asked them to rank their top complaints about leadership in their organizations. The results revealed a stunning lack of emotional intelligence among senior leaders and management, and show the importance of fundamental communication skills when it comes to engaging employees. The top employee complaints were ranked as follows:
October 1, 2015

Want Higher Engagement? Multiple Recognition Channels Can Get You There

Here’s what I like about whitepapers from IBM’s Smarter Workforce Institute: They are short in length and long on data and context. I appreciate that they share the underlying scientific concepts within their analyses of the data from their massive WorkTrends survey. Over 19,000 workers in 26 countries, a cross-section of industries, all major job families, and thousands of organizations responded to the 2013/2014 survey. Watson is all about slicing and dicing data, and he came up with some interesting, although not surprising, conclusions about the impact of multiple channels of employee recognition.